Monday, June 17, 2019

Four Rochdale grooming gang members are STILL in Britain with one living back at home again a decade after abusing girls as young as 12

  • Four of the men have not bee deported despite holding dual Pakistani citizenship
  • The men are among nine people who were convicted of abuse back in 2012 
  • Shabir Ahmed, Qari Abdul Rauf, Abdul Aziz and Adil Khan have dual citizenship 
  • Ahmed, 66, known as 'Daddy' is currently serving a 22-year jail term for rape
The victims of a notorious Rochdale grooming gang have been 'failed again' after it emerged four men have still not been deported a decade after preying on girls as young as 12.
Shabir Ahmed, 66, Qari Abdul Rauf, 50, Abdul Aziz, 48 and Adil Khan, 49, were among nine men convicted in 2012 of a catalogue of serious sex offences against vulnerable victims in Rochdale.
As the only groomers to have dual UK-Pakistani citizenship, they were at risk of being deported back to Pakistan - but none of the four appear to have been deported or be facing deportation.
Shabir Ahmed, left, and Adil Khan were among nine men to have been convicted of grooming girls in Rochdale in 2012. Along with Abdul Aziz and Qari Abdul Rauf, they were the only members of the gang to have dual British and Pakistani citizenship which means they could be deported by authorities given the serious nature of their crimes
Shabir Ahmed, left, and Adil Khan were among nine men to have been convicted of grooming girls in Rochdale in 2012. Along with Abdul Aziz and Qari Abdul Rauf, they were the only members of the gang to have dual British and Pakistani citizenship which means they could be deported by authorities given the serious nature of their crimes
Abdul Aziz and Qari Abdul Rauf, pictured, also have dual citizenship. The Home Office refused to comment whether deportation proceedings were active against any of the four men
Abdul Aziz and Qari Abdul Rauf, pictured, also have dual citizenship. The Home Office refused to comment whether deportation proceedings were active against any of the four men
Ahmed, known as 'Daddy' in the gang, is still serving a 22-year jail term for rape but Rauf is back living at his home address in Rochdale and Aziz has also been seen in the town, locals say.
Khan's exact whereabouts are not known.
One woman who was abused wet herself and ran into a shop after spotting her attacker in the town centre recently, according to locals, and another victim bumped into her abuser in a nightclub only last week.
The Home Office will not say whether a decision has been made to deport any of the four.
A spokeswoman said: 'We do not routinely comment on individual cases.'
Maggie Oliver, the detective who resigned from Greater Manchester Police and turned whistle-blower over the botched Rochdale inquiry, said: 'It doesn't surprise me they won't be straight with their answers after all this time because they don't want a public backlash.
'Ultimately the truth does have a way of coming out. The process most of these girls have been through has led them to expect very, very little from the authorities.
'They expect nothing and are not disappointed. They have been failed again and again and again.
'They do see some of these men around Rochdale on a fairly regular basis.
'It is really distressing for them, there's nothing that the girls can do. It's actually disgraceful.'
In 2016, then-home secretary Theresa May ruled it would be 'conducive to the public good' to deprive the four of the right to remain in the UK.
They then fought, and lost, a long legal battle against deprivation of UK citizenship, losing a final Court of Appeal ruling in July last year.
Eight judges, including the Master of the Rolls Lord Justice Sales, have now heard their case and upheld rulings all four should lose UK citizenship rights.
It has been heard across a series of hearings spanning three years, for most of which the four were legally aided.
At a previous hearing, judges noted the decision to strip an individual of UK citizenship, called a deprivation order, does not automatically lead to deportation order.
They said it was 'reasonable to assume', however, that a deprivation order is a prelude to a deportation.
Lawyers said it is probable the four will invoke the European Convention on Human Rights to argue their right to a family life would be impinged if they were removed from the UK.
Ms Oliver added: 'Once you commit these horrific offences your human rights should come second.
'It makes me really angry and it's really upsetting whey you think what they have done that they even have any rights.'
Former taxi driver Aziz, a father-of-three, regularly took his young victim to different flats around Rochdale, where she was plied with cannabis and vodka and coerced into sex with men who paid him cash.
Referred to as 'The Master' by the gang, he played a 'leading role' in the grooming.
Jailed for nine years in May 2012, he was released in December 2015 after serving three years and seven months.
Rauf, a father-of-five, trafficked a 15-year-old girl for sex, driving her to secluded areas to have sex with her in his taxi and ferry her to a flat in Rochdale where he and others had sex with her.
He was jailed for six years and released in November 2014 after serving two years and six months of his sentence.
A neighbour told the Press Association he has a night-time driving job.
Khan got a girl, 13, pregnant but denied he was the father then met another girl, 15, and trafficked her to others using violence when she complained.
He was sentenced to eight years, released in 2016 and was last known to be living in Manchester.
For two years from early 2008, girls as young as 12 were plied with alcohol and drugs and gang-raped in rooms above takeaway shops and ferried to different flats in taxis where cash was paid to use the girls.
Police said as many as 47 girls were groomed.
Nazir Afzal, the lawyer credited with pursuing the groomers, overturning an earlier decision not to prosecute, said: 'I am concerned that despite the efforts that have been made to ensure they are no longer a threat to women and girls in this country, that they remain in this country and the process continues and is prolonged.'
Billy Howarth, founder of Parents Against Grooming UK in Rochdale, said: 'We demand an explanation as to why they have not been deported.
'That was one of the promises, that these men would be removed from the country so they would not have to set eyes on them again.
'People are going mad over it, especially the people who live on the same streets with them.'
A spokeswoman for current Home Secretary, Rochdale-born Sajid Javid, has been approached for comment.
A staff member at the office for Rochdale MP Tony Lloyd said no-one was available for comment.

the jihadis next door: The eight men who stood in prayer behind ISIS flag in London

Standing shoulder-to-shoulder in London’s Regent’s Park, eight men stand in prayer behind a black flag used by groups including Islamic State.
The men were caught on camera for The Jihadis Next Door, a Channel 4 documentary that was aired in 2016 and which lifted the lid on the scale of Islamic fanaticism in Britain.
The event was organised by Al-Muhajiroun, a group led by the hate preacher Anjem Choudary which had been banned by the Government in 2006.
The prayers were led by Mohammed Shamsuddin, 42, a hate preacher who has claimed benefits for much of his life and who was effectively Choudary’s deputy.
Today, The Mail on Sunday can reveal the identities of all eight men and the lives of hate-filled extremism they went on to lead.
From left to right, they are named for the first time as Shakil Chapra (one), Murat Kocchat (two), Abdul Muquith (three), Khuram Butt (four), Emmanuel Kelly Asamoah (five), Adinan Abdulatif (six), Taha Hussain (seven) and Ricardo McFarlane (eight)
From left to right, they are named for the first time as Shakil Chapra (one), Murat Kocchat (two), Abdul Muquith (three), Khuram Butt (four), Emmanuel Kelly Asamoah (five), Adinan Abdulatif (six), Taha Hussain (seven) and Ricardo McFarlane (eight)
1) Shakil Chapra
A former part-time bus driver who spouts hatred on YouTube using the name Abu Haleema. 
He was stripped of his passport in 2014 over fears he wanted to join IS in Syria and was quizzed by police about his association with a British schoolboy later jailed for life for encouraging a man in Australia to carry out an atrocity.
2) Murat Kocchat
An extremist thought to be of Turkish-Kurdish origin. He has been photographed attending Al-Muhajiroun rallies and was caught on camera in the Channel 4 documentary listening closely to Shamsuddin sermon.
3) Abdul Muquith
Using the name Abu Sayfillaah, Muquith posts lectures on YouTube in which he says Muslims must never mingle or live with non-Muslims. It is understood his face was obscured in the documentary because he was then under police investigation.
4) Khuram Butt
The mastermind of the London Bridge terror attack in June 2017 that left eight people dead. The married father of two was described as a ‘heavyweight’ member of Al-Muhajiroun.
5) Emmanuel Kelly Asamoah
A regular at Al-Muhajiroun rallies, Asamoah was photographed at a 2014 demonstration outside the Indian High Commission in London with extremists including Siddhartha Dhar, who fled to Syria in 2014.
6) Adinan Abdulatif
An extremist from Barking, East London, Abdulatif was involved in credit card fraud with Butt in the months before the London Bridge atrocity. He later pleaded guilty to fraud.
7) Taha Hussain
The 21-year-old from Slough, Berkshire, was jailed for four-and-a-half years in 2017 for making a video outside Windsor Castle in which he pledged to kill non-believers.
8) Ricardo McFarlane
A veteran Al-Muhajiroun preacher, the 32-year-old convert was arrested in 2012 for leading ‘Sharia patrols’ in East London to impose Islamic law on the streets. He was sentenced to 26 weeks for his role in intimidating people.
 
Revealed: How London Bridge terror ringleader made mystery calls with a man, 33, in the hours before rampage
The mastermind of the London Bridge terror cell Khuram Butt (pictured above) repeatedly communicated with a 33-year-old man from East London in the hours before the deadly rampage
The mastermind of the London Bridge terror cell Khuram Butt (pictured above) repeatedly communicated with a 33-year-old man from East London in the hours before the deadly rampage
The mastermind of the London Bridge terror cell repeatedly communicated with a 33-year-old man from East London in the hours before the deadly rampage, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.
Irfan Saeed, who lives in a council flat in Newham, was in contact with killer Khuram Butt, 27, by phone and text message in the five hours before the knife-wielding gang of fanatics went on a murder spree that left eight people dead.
Evidence submitted to the inquest into the attack on June 3, 2017, details how Butt called Saeed just after 5pm, shortly after hiring the van that carried him, Rachid Redouane, 30, and Yousef Zaghba, 22, into Central London. Butt also sent a text to Saeed at about the same time.
Saeed texted the terrorist back and then called him unsuccessfully at least six times between 5.10pm and before the rampage began at about 10pm.
Two days after the atrocity – in which the three killers were shot dead by police – Saeed contacted the administrator of a secret WhatsApp group of which both he and Butt were members to request all the content be deleted because ‘police were making arrests’ in Newham.
The WhatsApp group was called ILMA – meaning ‘knowledge’ in Arabic – and was used to share extremist material.
The inquest at the Old Bailey was told how Saeed was among 22 people arrested in connection with the London Bridge rampage.
None was charged but a file on Saeed was sent to the Crown Prosecution Service because detectives suspected he knew about the attack before it was launched, yet did nothing to stop it – an offence that carries a sentence of up to five years.
Saeed, who could not be contacted for comment, has denied any wrongdoing. The inquest continues.

Sunday, June 16, 2019

Two boats carrying 40 migrants from Pakistan, Iraq and Afghanistan are intercepted off the coast of Kent

  • Border Force officers intercepted 40 migrants on small vessels on Kent coast 
  • Men, women and children identified themselves as Pakistani, Iraqi and Afghan
  • The news comes just two days after 38 tried to make the perilous crossing
  • 152 migrants have now been caught by Border Force since the start of June 
Border Force intercepted two boats carrying 40 migrants from PakistanIraq and Afghanistan off the coast of Kent - making it 152 since the start of June.
The Home Office confirmed men, women and children were brought ashore near St Margaret's Bay, Kent, and medically assessed this morning.
Charlie Elphicke, the Tory MP for Dover, urged action to 'prevent a summer of chaos in the English Channel.'
The news comes after 38 were intercepted at Dungeness, Kent, on Wednesday, and another 74 were captured off East Sussex on June 1.
The Home Office confirmed men, women and children were intercepted on vessels off the coast of St Margaret's Bay, Kent this morning (stock image)
The Home Office confirmed men, women and children were intercepted on vessels off the coast of St Margaret's Bay, Kent this morning (stock image)
A Home Office spokeswoman said: 'Anyone crossing the Channel in a small boat is taking a huge risk with their life and the lives of their children.
'It is an established principle that those in need of protection should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach and since January more than 35 people who arrived illegally in the UK in small boats have been returned to Europe.' 
Mr Elphicke said 'more migrants have arrived so far this year than arrived in the whole of last year' and described the situation as a 'crisis'.
'The Home Office needs to regain control of our borders and seek a proper agreement with the French to stop these people leaving the French coast,' he said.
'This is not just about border security. We've got to stop vulnerable people being exploited by criminal trafficking gangs.
'And protect life - these are overcrowded boats with men, women & children aboard.
A woman as the part of the group intercepted at Dungeness on Wednesday - the group, who identified themselves as Iranian or Iraqi, included men, women and children
A woman as the part of the group intercepted at Dungeness on Wednesday - the group, who identified themselves as Iranian or Iraqi, included men, women and children
A rubber dinghy which landed as part of a group of 38 at Dungeness on Wednesday
A rubber dinghy which landed as part of a group of 38 at Dungeness on Wednesday
'There is a real risk of a tragedy in the middle of the English Channel resulting in loss of life.' 
One dinghy carrying nine was intercepted as it came ashore early on Wednesday morning at Dungeness, Kent, another 29 were apprehended on two other vessels by a patrol boat.  
The 38 people were made up of men, women and children, all claiming to be either Iranian or Iraqi.   
Earlier this month 74 including several children were detained as eight boats tried to cross the Channel, with one landing at Winchelsea Caravan Park beach, East Sussex.
Eight vessels made it to shore, landing at Winchelsea Caravan Park beach, East Sussex on June 1, with a total of 74 migrants being captured
Eight vessels made it to shore, landing at Winchelsea Caravan Park beach, East Sussex on June 1, with a total of 74 migrants being captured
Home Secretary Sajid Javid described the incident as 'concerning.' 
Britain saw a surge in the number of migrants coming into the country last November.
And in December, after 138 made it on to UK shores, the Home Secretary declared a 'major incident' and hauled in extra Border Force cutters.
But last month saw that figure beaten, with 140 getting into the country.  
The Home Office has agreed a joint action plan with France and increased activity out of the Joint Coordination and Information Centre in Calais.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Taxi driver, 27, is jailed for 16 years after he murdered his teenage wife by hitting her with a frying pan, stabbing her 38 times and strangling her

  • Mohammad Qoraishi moved to Kent to be with Parwin after arranged marriage 
  • But he raged at her father that his friends said his wife didn't care about him 
  • Came as he demanded she move to Hull in East Yorkshire where he grew up 
  • Jailed for 16 years and 82 days before he can be considered for parole 
Mohammad Qoraishi (pictured) murdered his wife Parwin after she refused to move to Hull and has been jailed for 16 years
Mohammad Qoraishi (pictured) murdered his wife Parwin after she refused to move to Hull and has been jailed for 16 years 
A taxi driver who brutally murdered his 19-year-old wife because he as embarrassed by her refusal to bend to his will has been jailed for 16 years.
Mohammad Qoraishi, 27, knifed Parwin 38 times, battered her with a frying pan and strangled her in their kitchen as she was cooking eggs on Christmas Day.
After their arranged marriage, the thug was infuriated because the aspiring lawyer had refused to leave their home in Kent and move to Hull, East Yorkshire, where he had grown up.
Trouble started after they married in August 2018, when Qoraishi insisted his wife relocate despite her having been accepted onto a university course.  
Her family insisted that he move to be close to them instead, leading to tensions between Qoraishi and his father-in-law.
In a text to Parwin in November last year while still living apart, Qoraishi - also known as Tawos - told her: 'I'm f***ing p***ed off big time. People are telling me what type of wife you have when she doesn't give a s*** about you.
'You make things hard for me now. I have to work like a donkey now. I am coming but I'm not happy at all because you don't listen to me.'
His friend tried to intervene but was told by Parwin's father, also a taxi driver: 'Curse to his clan, curse to anyone backing him. Tawos is no more than a donkey. Tawos is an animal.'
The father found Parwin dead on her kitchen floor hours after he last spoke to her, Maidstone Crown Court heard.  
Prosecutor Alexandra Healy QC said: 'Parwin Quriashi was the victim of a ferocious and sustained attack in her own kitchen.
'She had 38 stab wounds. She had also been strangled and hit to the back of her head with a frying pan.
'The defendant fled the scene in his Audi A3 and was subsequently apprehended in the vicinity of Dover, no doubt the Crown say, intending to try to leave the country, not appreciating that because it was Christmas Day, the Port of Dover was closed.'
Parwin was found on her side holding the knife while dressed in a blood-stained pink top, trousers and socks.
Despite the efforts of her father, paramedics and an air ambulance crew, she was declared dead at the scene.
Qoraishi fled the flat in his car, triggering an ANPR camera at 12.22pm, and drove to see a relative in Croydon, south London, before heading back down through Kent to Dover.
Police spotted him on the A2 just after 4.30pm as he waited at traffic lights and was arrested. His denim jacket, jeans and T-shirt were blood-stained.
He admitted killing Parwin, and was sentenced to at least 16 years and 82 days before being considered for parole.
Passing sentence, Judge David Griffith-Jones QC said Qoraishi had 'frenziedly and senselessly' murdered his young wife, who would have been a 'bright light' at Canterbury Christchurch University.
'You also wrenched her from her immediate family in the most unexpected and brutal of fashions, depriving them of a daughter and sister, thereby inflicting on her parents and siblings a degree of pain and suffering so sudden and extreme that it will surely live with them forever.
'I accept you were not your normal self. You were in a rage and you snapped. However, the inescapable fact is you then proceeded deliberately to perform these acts of utter barbarity.
'You have now, in the cold light of day, had to face the enormity of what you have done, and I am prepared to accept that your feelings of shame, embarrassment and remorse are genuine and not simply the product of self-pity.' 
Hull friends of the taxi driver have spoken of their shock at the killing. Qoraishi worked as a black cab driver in the city before moving to Kent. 
Shwan Hawler says Qoraishi had never showed any signs of violence and he has been left completely shocked by the news. Mr Hawler met Qoraishi in Spring Bank restaurants and takeaways. 
He said: 'He seemed a very good person and I really don't why this happened but I heard from some people they said he had a family problem. I was shocked.
'He talked me like a friend but I don't know what he thinks inside his mind. He was always laughing and talking.'
The couple, who had an arranged marriage in Afghanistan in August 2018, moved in together just five days before Christmas but their days living together lasted less than a week.
It is believed Qoraishi got most of his trade as a taxi driver working from Paragon Interchange before he made the move to Maidstone.
The pair, who were also paternal cousins and grew up in the same house, moved apart when he headed to England in 2007 to build a new life - until she joined him in the UK with some of her family in Maidstone in 2011.
As a teenager he began life in Hull where he studied at Endeavour High School before getting into work.
Another man, who does not want to be named, recalled meeting him for the first time when they were both 15 years old but says there was never any sign of what was to come.
'We were in extra English lessons at Endeavour,' he said. 'He had always been really nice. He was always smiling and chatty.
'It was only for a year that I knew him. He was very pleasant. He came up to me a couple of years ago in a gym. He said he was a delivery driver or he was working in a takeaway.
'It was like speaking to some normal person you haven't seen for a while. There were no violent comments or anything. Nothing about hurting anyone or anything ever. I don't justify any of what happened but you don't know what goes through peoples heads.' 

Ten terrorists are recalled to prison while on licence sparking fears too many are being released early

  • Figures bring into question whether the terrorists are being released too early
  • The Home Office figure is double the previous year total of five being recalled
  • The 268 arrests made in the year until March was down on 443 the previous year
  • Islamist extremists made up the bulk of suspects in custody for terror offences
  • But there was also an increase in the arrests of those on the extreme right-wing
Ten convicted jihadis were chucked back in their cells after breaching their licence conditions last year - marking the highest ever total.
The figures, from a new report by the Home Office, brings into question whether the terrorists are being released from jail while they are still radicalised and dangerous.
Criminals can be dragged back to prison if they break the rules of their probation while released on licence or parole, in a move called 'recall'.
Ten convicted jihadis were recalled to prison after breaching their licence conditions last year - marking the highest ever total. Pictured: The inside of Belmarsh Prison where notorious hate preacher Anjem Choudary was released from last year
Ten convicted jihadis were recalled to prison after breaching their licence conditions last year - marking the highest ever total. Pictured: The inside of Belmarsh Prison where notorious hate preacher Anjem Choudary was released from last year 
They have to serve out the rest of their sentence unless a parole board or the Secretary of State for Justice decides to release them.
The shocking number of terrorists being recalled is double the previous year total of five.
The notorious case of ISIS supporting hate preacher Anjem Choudary saw him serve just half his five and a half year sentence when he was released last year.
He has since tried to keep a low profile by refusing to address reporters outside his east London home.
Choudary pictured in London last week. He was released last year just half way through a five and a half year sentence
Choudary pictured in London last week. He was released last year just half way through a five and a half year sentence
The Home Office report - released yesterday - shows the number of people arrested for terror offences in Britain has dropped by 40 per cent in the last year, compared with the 12-month period which saw several high-profile attacks on London and Manchester.
The 268 arrests made in the year ending March 2019 was significantly down on the 443 the previous year - the highest since records began - which included the Manchester Arena bombing as well as terror attacks at London Bridge, Parsons Green and Finsbury Park.
Islamist extremists made up the bulk of suspects in custody for terror-related offences.
There were 178 in the last year, down from 186 the year before which is the first time since 2014 the number has not increased.
There are currently 223 terrorists in prison in the UK, which is down 2 per cent on last year and the first drop in numbers since 2013.
Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu, National Lead for Counter Terrorism Policing, said in the report: 'The modern terrorist threat involves simple planning and preparation, with easy access to weaponry and materials.
'Offences previously viewed as outlying are in fact indicative of preliminary behaviour of an intent to commit acts of terrorism.'
He added: 'It is important for these terrorist related offences to have much longer sentences proportionate to the gravity of the crimes committed and the threat to the public.'
Just over one third, or 90, of the total 268 arrests resulted in a charge, while some 69 people, or 26 per cent, were released without charge, according to Home Office data.
Of the 70 people charged with a terrorism-related offence, 32 had been prosecuted, all of whom had been convicted.
London Bridge attacker Khuram Shazad Butt
IS executioner Mohammed Reza Haqu
A Sri Lanka bomber
London Bridge attacker Khuram Shazad Butt (left) and IS executioner Mohammed Reza Haqu (centre) were indoctrinated and carried out killings under the banner of Islamic State. The Sri Lanka bombers (one pictured right) are also believed to have had ties with Islamic State
The 268 represents the lowest total since 251 arrests in 2014.
The figures show that 41 per cent were white, which was the highest percentage since the 42 per cent recorded in March 2004.
Black suspects accounted for 11.9 per cent of those arrested in the 12 months to March 2019, up slightly from 9.9 per cent the previous year.
The data also showed Asian suspects accounted for 36.2 per cent of those arrested in 2018-19, down from 40.6 per cent in the 12 months prior, and the lowest percentage since 2006 34.9 per cent.
But the report did show an increase in the number and percentage of arrests for suspects with extreme right-wing ideologies.
A total of 33 people with such views were arrested in the year to March 2019, up from 29 the previous year, and nine the year before that.
It accounted for 14.8 per cent of those arrested, up from 12.7 per cent and 5 per cent in the previous two years.
Choudary has severe restrictions on his movements — he is electronically tagged and effectively gagged — but has been spotted out as late as 11pm.
The electronic tag worn as a condition of Choudary's early release from jail is clearly visible under his clothes
The electronic tag worn as a condition of Choudary's early release from jail is clearly visible under his clothes
Many might think it deeply offensive that this disgraced Islamist, who co-founded the British jihadist network al-Muhajiroun and has been an avowed supporter of terrorism here and abroad, is walking the streets of the capital as the inquest into the London Bridge terror attack is takes place.
Over the past few weeks, the inquest has heard that Khuram Butt, the ringleader of that atrocity in 2017, was 'like a lion out of a cage' after meeting Choudary. 
Eight people died as Butt, 27, Rachid Redouane, 30, and Youssef Zaghba, 22, mowed down pedestrians and stabbed people in a frenzy of horrific violence before being shot dead by police.
Anjem Choudary leaves a bail hostel in north London after his release from Belmarsh Prison last year. The hate preacher was recently allowed to leave the hostel and return to his family home in London
Anjem Choudary leaves a bail hostel in north London after his release from Belmarsh Prison last year. The hate preacher was recently allowed to leave the hostel and return to his family home in London
Insensitivity to the families of the bereaved is not the only issue.
Security experts have said Choudary's very presence in public is providing succour to followers of his ideology.
An unnamed disciple of Choudary, formerly under effective house arrest in Suffolk, recently told the New York Times: 'People are waiting for Anjem to come out; they are waiting for that spark.'

Friday, June 14, 2019

Terrorists can work at airports without MI5 being tipped off

TERROR suspects can still land jobs at airports and major railway hubs without police or MI5 being tipped off, a court heard yesterday.

butt
Khuram Butt worked on the Tube (Image: Metropolitan Police/PA Wire)
Even potential jihadists seen as "high-risk" and under investigation could slip through the net. Khuram Butt was under investigation by Scotland Yard and the security services when he was recruited by Transport for London in May 2016. The inquest into the London Bridge atrocity heard that Butt, 27, was allowed to work at various Tube stations including Westminster, near Parliament. At the time, he was the target of a joint police/MI5 probe as a "high-risk" terror suspect.
The security loophole emerged as a senior MI5 officer, known as Witness L, gave evidence. The officer agreed when Gareth Patterson, QC, representing the families of six victims, said: "Would you agree that risks are being taken if terror suspects are being permitted to hold down jobs where the transport infrastructure is vulnerable?" Speaking from behind a screen at the Old Bailey, Witness L also accepted Mr Patterson's question: "Is the position that to this day, people can still be terror suspects and start working at these sorts of locations without you or the counter-terrorism police being notified of it?" The officer said there was no evidence that Butt took the job for "nefarious purposes".
MI5 launched an investigation into Butt in 2015 after intelligence said he was linked to terror but the probe was suspended twice - once in February 2016 after attacks in Paris and again after the Westminster Bridge atrocity in March 2017.
MI5 was initially unaware Butt was regularly going to a gym run by a notorious terrorist suspect while on sick leave.
Butt's accomplices Rachid Redouane, 30, and Youssef Zaghba, 22, also went to the gym in Ilford, east London. But Witness L said training at a gym was not a risk factor in itself.
Butt was still under investigation when he led the attack in June 2017 which claimed eight innocent lives.
The MI5 probe was being wound down and his movements or calls not being monitored in the days leading up to the outrage. The inquest continues.

“BBC bosses accused of ‘sanitising’ Islamist attacks after it emerges reporters will be told to stop using the word ‘terror’ unless quoting someone else”

  • BBC journalists will be effectively banned from using the word 'terror' in reports
  • Their reporters are already advised to steer clear of 'terrorist' and 'terrorism'
  • They will refer to terror attacks by naming specific details such as the location 
  • Yesterday, MPs and experts accused the BBC of 'failing in its public service duty' 
The BBC has been accused of 'sanitising' terrorism under plans for an effective ban on journalists using the word 'terror'.
Reporters will be told to avoid using the word to describe any terror attack, unless they are quoting someone else.
Instead, they will refer to terror attacks by naming specific details, such as the location and the method of slaughter used.
According to well-placed BBC sources, bosses are eager to report terror attacks consistently, regardless of the terrorists' political ideology. The terrorist attack in Nice, France is pictured above, when an Islamic terrorist drove into a crowd watching a fireworks display in July 2016
According to well-placed BBC sources, bosses are eager to report terror attacks consistently, regardless of the terrorists' political ideology. The terrorist attack in Nice, France is pictured above, when an Islamic terrorist drove into a crowd watching a fireworks display in July 2016
The controversial edict means that the BBC will no longer use the phrase 'terror attack' to describe the massacres at London Bridge or Manchester Arena, as the corporation did when the atrocities occurred.
Reporters would describe them as the London Bridge van attack or the Manchester Arena bomb attack instead. 
But yesterday, MPs and experts accused the broadcaster of 'failing in its public service duty'.
David Green, a former Home Office adviser and chief executive of the think tank Civitas, said: 'If they don't want to use that [the word terror] then they're failing in their public service duty which is to be clear and accurate.
The new ruling is likely to anger critics who objected to the way the BBC covered the New Zealand terror attack earlier this year. It appeared to avoid using the phrase terror attack by referring to it as the 'Christchurch shooting'
The new ruling is likely to anger critics who objected to the way the BBC covered the New Zealand terror attack earlier this year. It appeared to avoid using the phrase terror attack by referring to it as the 'Christchurch shooting'
'I think there is a common usage, which has some recognition in law, which if you use attempted killing or injury to a political objective, then that's terrorism.
'It would be misleading not to say that these are terrorist episodes if they are attempts to advance a political or ideological cause through violence.
'The Christchurch one [in New Zealand] was someone a bit wacky but he was trying to make a political point, and all the Islamist episodes are aimed at a political outcome.'
Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen said: 'They are terrorists and these are terror attacks. The BBC should not try to sanitise the behaviour of terrorists by not calling it out.'
According to well-placed BBC sources, bosses are eager to report terror attacks consistently, regardless of the terrorists' political ideology. But instead of branding them all as terror attacks and risk accusations of bias, it wants to avoid the word altogether.
A senior news source said: 'It boils down to that phrase, 'One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter'. 
Our question is, 'Is Darren Osborne [who was behind the Finsbury Park terror attack] a terrorist?' He is being motivated by far-Right thinking, in the same way as the guys in the attack on London Bridge. Consistency will be the key.'
Many BBC reporters are angered by the decision, which will come into force when the BBC's new editorial guidelines are published this month. 
A source said: 'The end result is a desire to squeeze the word terror out altogether, which many people think is nuts.'
Members of the public are pictured above being evacuated from the arena following the Manchester Arena terrorist attack in May 2017. According to The New Oxford Dictionary of English, a 'terrorist' is someone who uses 'violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims'
Members of the public are pictured above being evacuated from the arena following the Manchester Arena terrorist attack in May 2017. According to The New Oxford Dictionary of English, a 'terrorist' is someone who uses 'violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims'
BBC reporters are already advised to steer clear of 'terrorist' and 'terrorism', under guidance first drawn up during the IRA bombings. 
Guidelines tell staff: 'Terrorism is a difficult and emotive subject with significant political overtones.' Presenters use the words 'militant' or 'jihadists' as substitutes.
The new ruling is likely to anger critics who objected to the way the BBC covered the New Zealand terror attack earlier this year. It appeared to avoid using the phrase terror attack by referring to it as the 'Christchurch shooting'. 
At the time, BBC News editorial director Kamal Ahmed defended the move, saying there is 'no agreed definition of what a terrorist is'. However, he said there was no ban on any expression.
According to The New Oxford Dictionary of English, a 'terrorist' is someone who uses 'violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims'.

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Strict Muslim father 'inflicted a campaign of controlling psychological abuse on his own family after two of his eight daughters refused to enter into arranged marriages'

  • Salamat Khan, 63, and son Abbas, 34, allegedly controlled females in the family
  • Abbas is accused of following Madira Khan, 21, after she finished working 
  • He allegedly tried to punch his own mother and sent her tumbling into a cabinet 
  • The defendants deny controlling or coercive behaviour and common assault 
Salamat Khan (pictured outside Manchester Magistrates' Court yesterday) is accused of using coercive behaviour to control women in his family
Salamat Khan (pictured outside Manchester Magistrates' Court yesterday) is accused of using coercive behaviour to control women in his family 
A strict Muslim father and his son psychologically abused their female family members when two of eight daughters refused arranged marriages, a court heard.
Salamat Khan had married off three of his daughters to selected spouses but 'cast out' two of his other children when they married men he did not 'approve of.'
The 63-year-old allegedly claimed the sisters were 'dead to the family' from December 2015 to June 2018 and vowed to enforce a 'traditional' upbringing on two other unmarried daughters who wanted to lead a Western lifestyle.
He refused to let Madina and Maryha Khan go out in the evening or meet their friends and made then cook and clean for him and made them feel they were 'living in a prison,' it was said. 
Mr Khan is accused of demanding properties in the names of female relatives be transferred to him and his only son Abbas.
The 34-year-old is said to have insisted his sisters were not welcome in the family home adding: 'They made their choices'.
Police were called to the family home in Oldham, Greater Manchester, to reports of  a violent argument when Abbas demanded one of the property to be transferred to his name so he could facilitate his own wife emigrating to the UK, jurors heard. 
During the row Salamat's wife Zahida was pushed backwards by Abbas with such force, it caused a cabinet to fall off the wall, it was claimed.
Officers later spoke to Salamat about his two rebel daughters and he said: 'They can marry whoever they wish - but I want nothing to do with them.'
Salamat and his wife Zahida Begum, who have been married for 50 years, moved to the UK from their native Pakistan in 1979, Manchester Magistrates' Court heard.
Three of their daughters, Nasreen, Nasir and Zadine, all wed in Pakistan under arranged marriage but two others Bushra and Ishiat married other Muslim men who were not 'arranged' for them.
Madina and Maryha would stay for long periods in Pakistan where no arrangements were made to sort out their education, the court heard. The couple's eighth daughter is disabled.
Housewife Mrs Begum told the hearing: 'Bushra and Ishiat are not welcome by my husband or son. He doesn't allow me to meet up with her, but I can speak to her on the phone.
'Ishiat was married in England and I wanted to go to her wedding. I also wanted to go to Bushra's too but I wasn't allowed to go. My husband makes the decisions as does my son and I was encouraged not to contact my daughters after they got married without my husbands permissions. My husband doesn't want me to keep in contact.
Abbas Khan (pictured outside Manchester Magistrates' Court yesterday) allegedly threatened to kill his younger sister
Abbas Khan (pictured outside Manchester Magistrates' Court yesterday) allegedly threatened to kill his younger sister 
She added: 'On June 17th there was an incident and the police were called. There was arguing from my son and husband about the property. They were demanding me to transfer to name over. They called me and my daughters "bitches".' 
Madira Khan, 21, said: 'I have a mixture of friends both Muslim and non Muslim, girls and boys but my friends aren't allowed to come for tea. 
'They weren't allowed to come and visit me at home. I would have to come straight home and I wasn't allowed to socialise with friends outside of college.
'My father said I should always keep my college friends at college. Those were the rules and my brother enforced these rules when my dad was in Pakistan. 
'I would go to college then come home and he'll look after the household, I didn't socialise at all. I would be invited out by friends and I would have to make excuses as I knew my dad would say no.
'My sisters did date their husbands but it was a secret and my dad didn't know about this. My dad and brother didn't approve. 
'I went to Bushra and Ishiat weddings but I didn't ask for permission to go. My brother wouldn't let me go. I was scared to ask my dad as I was scared of him. I was scared in case it was a no.
'When they found out I went they were angry, they were cursing and shouting. They said no one was allowed contact with them and they were not welcome in the family home. They said: 'They make their choices'. My brother enforces that rules more than my dad. I go to see my sisters without asking my father or brother but I'm scared they might follow me. I'm scared what they might do.
'My brother used to follow me when I finished work, I told my dad and he didn't say anything to him, he didn't tell him to stop.'
She said that her brother tried to punch her mother, but she deflected it and was pushed into the cabinet instead. Ms Khan added that her brother threatened to kill her on multiple occasions during the row. 
Alan Bakker, prosecuting, said: 'Madina and Maryha were simply expected to look after dad, the house and to cook and clean. 
Salamat Khan told the hearing: 'I have been accused wrongly by my wife and daughters. They have intended to get rid of me and my son from the house and this is all just accusations. Often when I went to Pakistan, they were planning in my absence and I found out later about my daughters getting married but I couldn't do anything about it. When I heard about all those things I had a heart attack and I was in hospital.
'I gave my daughters the choice and the opportunity to carry out what they wanted to do. If they are married on their own wishes, I have no objections or complaints, they can live their life. But when I found out Bushra and Ishiat had married, I was upset and was crying for it. They spit in my face and they didn't even tell me about it. It was shame and I was concerned about my status. I don't know why they didn't tell me.'
Salamat and Abbas deny engaging in controlling or coercive behaviour and common assault. The case continues.