Thursday, April 28, 2016

UN meddler tells us to go easy on terrorists: Feted by jihadi apologists, NUS 'anti-Semitic' student leader and Assange, the Kenyan 'rapporteur' who scolded Britain's terror fight... while funded by our foreign aid

  • Maina Kiai is a Harvard-educated lawyer and a human rights chief 
  • Kenyan human rights chief condemned the Home Office's flagship scheme aimed at stopping young Muslims joining ISIS
  • The unelected United Nations inspector was on a three-day visit of London
  • Mr Kiai is unpaid, but his visits and reports are paid for by the UN 
An unelected United Nations inspector, whose job is funded by UK foreign aid cash, provoked outrage last night after he attacked Britain's crucial new counter-terror laws.

Kenyan human rights chief Maina Kiai condemned the Home Office's flagship scheme aimed at stopping young Muslims joining Islamic State and calling on teachers to report suspicious activity.

He also criticised crucial powers needed by security services to track terror suspects and plans to ban extremist groups.

Kenyan human rights chief Maina Kiai met Ibrahim Mohamoud, CAGE's communications officer. CAGE previously described Jihadi John as a 'beautiful young man' who was 'extremely kind and gentle'
Kenyan human rights chief Maina Kiai met Ibrahim Mohamoud, CAGE's communications officer. CAGE previously described Jihadi John as a 'beautiful young man' who was 'extremely kind and gentle'

The grandly titled Special Rapporteur On The Rights To Freedom Of Peaceful Assembly And Of Association launched his attack on Britain during a three-day visit to London last week.

He met contentious figures including WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, a radical students' leader accused of anti-Semitism, and members of a prisoners' rights group who called Jihadi John a 'beautiful young man'.

Last night former Defence Secretary Liam Fox hit back at Mr Kiai saying: 'With the level of oppression, abuse of human rights and terrorism around the world, I would think the United Nations would have better things to do with its resources and manpower than investigating one of the most peaceful, liberal and free countries.

'We don't make contributions to the UN to have them stick their noses into our country – we give them to improve the lot of people who don't know what freedom and security are.'

Mr Kiai is a Harvard-educated lawyer from Kenya which, its critics say, has far worse problems with human rights and terrorism than Britain does.

The capital Nairobi is home to the world's biggest slum, the Kenyan president has been accused of crimes against humanity, and Islamist group Al-Shabaab killed hundreds of people in massacres at a shopping mall and Garissa University.

In his role as Special Rapporteur, Mr Kiai was invited by the Government to observe freedom of association in Britain in 2013, and returned last week for an update. On the first day of his visit he met charities and members of 'civil society'.

Mr Kiai was also photographed with his arm around Malia Bouattia (standing on Mr Kiai's right), the newly elected president of the National Union of Students.
Mr Kiai was also photographed with his arm around Malia Bouattia (standing on Mr Kiai's right), the newly elected president of the National Union of Students.
Mr Kiai also went to the Ecuadorian Embassy in Knightsbridge where Julian Assange has been granted asylum and has lived for almost four years since Britain's top court agreed to his extradition to Sweden for questioning over rape and sexual assault claims by two women
Mr Kiai also went to the Ecuadorian Embassy in Knightsbridge where Julian Assange has been granted asylum and has lived for almost four years since Britain's top court agreed to his extradition to Sweden for questioning over rape and sexual assault claims by two women

He was pictured shaking hands with Ibrahim Mohamoud, communications officer for CAGE, the prisoners' rights group that described IS executioner Mohammed Emwazi – known as Jihadi John – as a 'beautiful young man' who was 'extremely kind and gentle', and blamed his radicalisation on MI5.

Mr Kiai was also photographed with his arm around Malia Bouattia, the newly elected president of the National Union of Students. 

She has caused a split in the union as she once claimed it was Islamophobic for the union to pass a motion condemning IS, and described Birmingham University, where she studied, as a 'Zionist outpost'.

Mr Kiai went on to meet MPs on the Joint Committee on Human Rights, travelled to the Home Office to see Policing Minister Mike Penning and Scotland Yard chiefs, and even took a lift in a patrol car to one of his appointments in Whitehall.

He also went to the Ecuadorian Embassy in Knightsbridge where Julian Assange has been granted asylum and has lived for almost four years since Britain's top court agreed to his extradition to Sweden for questioning over rape and sexual assault claims by two women. Mr Kiai was pictured smiling with Mr Assange.

Mr Kiai went on to meet MPs on the Joint Committee on Human Rights, travelled to the Home Office to see Policing Minister Mike Penning (pictured right)  and Scotland Yard chiefs
Mr Kiai went on to meet MPs on the Joint Committee on Human Rights, travelled to the Home Office to see Policing Minister Mike Penning (pictured right)  and Scotland Yard chiefs

Mr Kiai delivered his damning verdict on the Government's anti-terror plans at a press conference after his meetings.

He said that the Prevent counter-radicalisation strategy actually risked 'promoting extremism' by alienating Muslims, and created a 'Big Brother' society that left families afraid to discuss terrorism in their own homes.

Mr Kiai is unpaid, but his visits and reports are paid for by the UN, to which the Foreign Office contributed £518 million last year.

A spokesman for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights said: 'The funding for the Special Rapporteur On Freedom Of Peaceful Assembly And Association comes from the United Nations regular budget, which is approved by the General Assembly every two years.






Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Asian child sex gang who included a bus driver who met victims as he took them home from school in Rochdale are jailed for total of 125 years

  • Main victim in the shocking case was a white girl with learning difficulties
  • She was repeatedly groomed for sex from the age of 14 by a group of men
  • Judge paid tribute to her bravery today as he handed out long sentences 
  • Public gallery broke into applause as judge gave one man 25-year term
Ten men have been jailed for a total of more than 125 years for sexual offences against eight girls and women in Rochdale.

They included Afraz Ahmed, a former bus driver who picked up two of his young victims from school and offered them free tickets.

He was originally questioned in 2006 but a decision was made not to prosecute him after he claimed the girls' complaints against him were racially motivated. 

The public gallery broke into applause today when Ahmed was handed a 25-year sentence.
The main victim in the case was white and had learning difficulties. 

She was said by prosecutors to be an 'extremely vulnerable young woman' who had endured 'a very difficult home life'. 

Former bus driver Afraz Ahmed - who claimed his victims were racist when he was originally arrested - got the longest sentence. He motioned to the judge to ask if he could say something after he was given the jail term, but he was ordered to leave the dock
Former bus driver Afraz Ahmed - who claimed his victims were racist when he was originally arrested - got the longest sentence. He motioned to the judge to ask if he could say something after he was given the jail term, but he was ordered to leave the dock
Kutab Miah of Rochdale, for nine years.
Choudry Hussein got 19 years for rape. Hussain is currently on the run, believed to be in Pakistan, after absconding during his trial
Kutab Miah (left) of Rochdale, for nine years. Choudry Hussein (right) got 19 years for rape. Hussain is currently on the run, believed to be in Pakistan, after absconding during his trial

She walked into a police station after media coverage of the 2012 convictions of a number of Asian defendants for grooming white girls for sex in the town.

She told officers that from the age of 14 she too had been repeatedly sexually groomed by a large number of men in Rochdale.

The main victim in the case said that 'hundreds' of men would ring her up, wanting her to go out and have sex with them, during the time she was groomed.

The offences, which also involved other under-age victims, took place in Rochdale and the surrounding area, mainly between 2005 and 2010.

Nine of the defendants were sentenced at Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court today, while another man was jailed last year.

Judge John Potter said: 'Each of the victims... was subjected to cross-examination which suggested they were not telling the truth. Each dealt with this ordeal impressively.

'I have little doubt that each of the victims have been affected by your abuse of them to some degree, some far more than others.'

Abid Khan got six-and-a-half years
Rehan Ali was imprisoned for seven years
Abid Khan (left) got six-and-a-half years and Rehan Ali (right) was imprisoned for seven years
Mohammed Dauood (left), of Burnley, was jailed for 16 years
David Law, of Ilkeston,  was jailed for 11 years
Mohammed Dauood (left), of Burnley, was jailed for 16 years. David Law (right) was jailed for 11 years

The judge said it was testament to their 'bravery, courage and fortitude' they had given evidence in court despite the 'appalling way' they were treated. Two of the victims, he said, had suffered psychological harm. 

The main victim in the case gave evidence in two separate trials which lasted a total of 15 weeks.

Seven other complainants, who were aged 13 to 22 at the time of the offences, also came forward to testify, which secured convictions against a number of the defendants.

Former bus driver Ahmed, 33, of Rochdale, was found guilty of various sexual offences, including rape, conspiracy to rape and sexual activity with a child, in relation to five underage victims.

While working as a bus driver, Ahmed, then aged in his early 20s, spoke to his schoolgirl victims in a 'highly inappropriate manner', the court heard. 

He asked if one of them had a boyfriend and seemingly offered them free bus tickets.

The judge told Ahmed: 'You objectivised your vulnerable victims so you could exploit them for your own sexual desire.' 

Mohammed Zahid of Rochdale, got five years
Mahfuz Rahman was jailed for five-and-a-half years
Mohammed Zahid (left) of Rochdale, got five years. Mahfuz Rahman (right) was jailed for five-and-a-half years

On-the-run Choudry Hussein, 38, formerly of Rochdale, was jailed for 19 years in his absence for rape, sexual activity with a child and conspiracy to rape.

He is believed to be currently in Pakistan after he absconded during his trial.

Rehan Ali, 27, of Blackley, was imprisoned for seven years and Kutab Miah, 35, of Rochdale, for nine years after both were found guilty of rape and sexual activity with a child.

Abid Khan, 39, of Liverpool, was jailed for six-and-a-half years and Mohammed Zahid, 55, of Rochdale, for five years after both were found guilty of sexual activity with a child.

Mohammed Dauood, 38, of Burnley, was jailed for 16 years after he was convicted of offences in relation to two victims including rape, sexual activity with a child and sexual assault.

David Law, 46, of Ilkeston, Derbyshire, was jailed for 11 years after he was convicted of conspiracy to rape.

A tenth defendant, Mahfuz Rahman, 29, of HMP Garth, pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to three counts of sexual activity with a child. He was jailed for five-and-a-half years last September.

A 40-year-old man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was jailed for 23 years after he was convicted of rape and attempting to abduct a child in relation to three victims. 

He will serve an additional eight years on extended licence when he is released. 

Senior investigating officer Det Chief Insp Jamie Daniels said: 'This was an extremely complex case and I want to commend the victims for the immense bravery they have shown; only with their support have we arrived at this point.

'The process can be emotionally demanding and traumatic for the victims and we do not underestimate the courage this took.'




Politics graduate, 27, is JAILED after she tried to dodge a speeding fine by 'paying £450 for someone else to take three points' so she could keep a clean licence

  • Ayesha Ahmed, 27, was caught speeding in BMW twice within 5 minutes
  • Instead of paying speeding fine she hired a 'legal expert' who claimed he could exploit a legal loophole which would allow her to escape punishment
  • Instead he merely provided false driver details to enforcement officers
  • Ahmed told police she was the innocent victim of a scam by a fake lawyer 
  • She was found guilty of attempting to pervert course of justice and jailed
Ayesha Ahmed, 27, of Dudley, was caught speeding in her BMW twice within five minutes by a mobile camera van parked near her home
Ayesha Ahmed, 27, of Dudley, was caught speeding in her BMW twice within five minutes by a mobile camera van parked near her home
A politics graduate has been jailed for three months after she attempted to avoid a speeding fine by paying £450 for someone else to take the three points.  

Ayesha Ahmed, 27, of Dudley, West Midlands, was caught speeding at 39mph and 40mph in a 30mph zone in her BMW twice within five minutes by a mobile camera van parked near her home in July 2014. 

But rather than pay for an £85 speed awareness course, a £100 fine and accepting three points on her licence, the international relations and politics graduate paid £450 to a man she did not know who claimed he could exploit a 'legal loophole' which would enable her to escape punishment.

Notices of Intended Prosecution (NIPs) sent to Ahmed were then returned to enforcement officers claiming that a woman from Walsall was behind the wheel of the BMW at the time the offences were committed.

But officers became suspicious when inquiries revealed that speeding offences by eight different drivers had been attributed to a woman living at the same Walsall address, leading to Ahmed's arrest.

During her police interview Ahmed admitted she had tried to avoid receiving the penalty points but insisted she thought the £450 was being paid to a specialist speeding fine lawyer.

She then claimed she was the victim of a scam by a fake lawyer and protested her innocence.
But the court heard Ahmed had lied and was told by prosecutors that she was not the victim of a scam by a fake lawyer as she claimed because she knew what she was doing was illegal.

Politics graduate yet complete idiot...I am innocent ...but you're not ...you were speeding.


Scotland Yard hunt for violent fugitive who escaped from a secure mental health unit

  • Abdul Nahar went missing from Burtwood Lane in London on Tuesday 
  • The 26-year-old fugitive is described as a risk to himself and the public 
  • Officers have warned people not to approach mentally ill Nahar
  • Anyone with information about Nahar's location is asked to call the police 
A violent fugitive from a secure mental health unit is being hunted by police.

Abdul Nahar, 26, was last seen in Burntwood Lane, Wandsworth, south London, at around 12.16pm on Tuesday.

Scotland Yard warned the public to call 999 if they spot him, and added: 'Abdul has mental health issues and is a risk to the public and himself. 

The public are advised not to approach him.

The Metropolitan Police has warned members of the public to stay away from Abdul Nahar, pictured 
The Metropolitan Police has warned members of the public to stay away from Abdul Nahar, pictured 




'The hijab has no place in hospitals': Muslim writer says medicine should be free from religion and 'health hazard' clothing should be banned

  • Writer Yasmin Alibhai-Brown says veils should be banned in an NHS-wide dress code which applies to people of all religions
  • Says there is no place for religious doctrine in state-run hospitals
  • Argues there should be no compromise on health standards due to religion
  • NHS: Individual hospitals already have carefully worked out policies which balance religious freedom with infection risk and need for communications
  • Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, a writer and commentator, argues state-run institutions like hospitals should be free from the doctrine of religion - and says hijabs are a health hazard

Recently, I went to a large NHS teaching hospital in London for a blood test.

 A young couple was behind me in the queue. 

He was wearing a suit. She was completely covered.

 When I was finished and it was their turn, he started getting agitated and spoke loudly at the young man who was due to take blood from his wife.

The husband of the woman in hijab would not let a male doctor take blood. 'I need a woman to do this' he demanded angrily.

There 
There should be an NHS-wide dress code - applying to staff of any religion - that bans veils including hijab and niqab, argues writer and commentator Yasmin Alibhai-Brown. Veils are a health hazard, she said (file photo)

When the male nurse explained that there was no one else to take blood, the husband marched his wife away. There would be no blood test for her that day.

It turned out that the morality council in Saudi Arabia had recently announced that no Muslim woman could go to a hospital without a male relative and woman had to be seen by female doctors. 

These doctrines are increasingly be followed to the letter by so-called devout Muslims here too. 

We are seeing the rise of Wahhabism, a 19th century Saudi Arabian invention, throughout UK society and now in our state hospitals. 

Liberal muslims like myself are furious and helpless to stop this spread.

Doctors and nurses in NHS hospitals are increasingly needing to confront the issue of so-called Islamic modesty code for women head on, either because patients demand it, or their own co-workers make it an issue. 

I find that white liberal apologists are becoming complicit in the slow take over of a fascist element with Islam, that seeks to impose its views on the rest of us.

Ms Alibhai-Brown says the lack of NHS-wide ruling on Islamic dress simply causes confusion
Ms Alibhai-Brown says the lack of NHS-wide ruling on Islamic dress simply causes confusion
There is no NHS-wide ruling on Islamic dress in hospital wards and operating theatres. 

At the moment, it is up to individual trusts to decide how they want to negotiate the matter, which just causes confusion in my opinion.

Recently, an NHS consultant anaesthetist was suspended for confronting a Muslim surgeon who refused to remove her hijab for an operation. 

The Trust reinstated him when a hospital investigation found he had simply being enforcing the Trust's own strict codes to minimise infection. 

It said that religious headscarves are excluded in areas such as the theatre, where they could present a health and cross-infection hazard.

In Cairo in Egypt, the President of Cairo University has expanded his ban on the niqab face covering to all nurses, staff members of the faculty of medicine and female staff in the university's teaching hospitals, citing patient rights to know who is treating them.

I'm not in favour of a hijab ban but rather an NHS-wide dress code which applies to everyone whatever background or religion they come from.

In the medical setting, it is true that there should be no compromise because of health and safety hazards. 

Yes, it is important that a patient can see who the face of the person who is treating them. 
In the medical setting, it is true that there should be no compromise because of health and safety hazards 
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown 
However, my reason for instituting a dress code would not depend on these arguments, which by definition, allows some room for the idea that religious sentiment should be given any credence in the medical world.

Instead, I say that state run institutions including hospitals in a liberal society should be free from doctrine imposed by one section of society, not matter how intimidating and vocal they are. 

We don't have to give reasons.
 
Wearing veils in hospital - the NHS view  

An NHS spokesperson argues hospitals in different areas of the country already have policies in place which carefully balance people's desire to wear veils and the need to prevent infection and allow clear communication between staff and patients

The NHS has a long tradition of balancing patient safety and religious views and practices. 

In 2008 there was some debate over new health guidelines introduced to stop the spread of infections such as MRSA and Clostridium difficile.

There is growing discussion on wearing full face veils, such as the burqa and the nijab. 

They should not be confused with the hijab which is a headscarf that does not cover the face.

One of the stipulations in the 2008 guidelines was a 'bare below the elbow' dress code policy, which specified that arms should be bare below the elbows in clinical areas to ensure good hand and wrist washing.

Some Muslim doctors strongly objected to this, because it is regarded as immodest in Islam to expose any part of the body except the face and hands. 

At the same it was argued that this was a matter of patient safety.

Alder Hey Hospital was one of many hospitals who worked with their staff to find a local solution. 

In this case the trust agreed to provide facilities for them to change their outerwear and hijab for theatre scrubs.

Employers and employees have been able to find solutions to managing religious issues relating to the wearing of the veil in the workplace locally 
NHS spokesperson 
The above example is very much in line with the Equality Human Rights Commission (EHRC) 2013 guidance 'Religion or belief in the workplace: A guide for employers' – which was issued following a landmark European Court of Human Rights case.

The following is a summary of the EHRC guidance:

  • Employers needs to consider the cost, disruption and wider impact on business or work if the request is accommodated.

  • Employers need to consider whether there are health and safety implications for the proposed change.

  • Employers need to consider the disadvantage to the affected employee if the request is refused.

  • Employers need to consider the impact of any change on other employees, including on those who have a different religion or belief, or no religion or belief.

  • Employers needs to consider the impact of any change on customers or service users, and whether work policies and practices to ensure uniformity and consistency are justifiable.

in the NHS many trusts have already developed policies and practices in consultation with faith groups and staff involving the wearing of the veil.

Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation trust decided that, to ensure effective communication, clothing which covers the face (including a veil or niqab) would not be permitted for any staff in contact with patients, carers or visitors or for staff in other roles where clear face to face communication is essential, for example, training.

At the same time staff who wished to wear a veil when they were not working – such as in breaks, or during their lunch, or walking around the buildings were allowed to do so. 

However they were asked to be prepared to remove their veil if asked to check their identity against their ID badge, in line with the guidance drawn up last year.

Similarly The Royal London Hospital, St Bartholomew's Hospital and Whipps Cross University Hospital, have policies that indicate that faces must not be covered while staff are treating patients.

In addition Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS trust, have policies in place outlining that face coverings should not be worn when delivering patient care in order to aid communication and minimise infection risks.

These cases illustrate that employers and employees have been able to find solutions to managing religious issues relating to the wearing of the veil in the workplace locally.

The NHS has indicated that a general applicable ban on the wearing of full face veils in the workplace is not necessary or proportionate for any legitimate objective.

At the same time it has recognised through consultation with parties that some clearly defined restrictions on the wearing of full face veils for the purposes of public safety will be legitimate. 

In doing so professional standards have been maintained and hospitals have developed appropriate policies and practices in a way that is most appropriate for them to deliver a quality service.



Muslim Labour MP quits as aide to John McDonnell after sharing Facebook post suggesting Israel should be moved to the US with the message: 'Problem solved'

  • Naz Shah today apologised for 'offence caused' by her Facebook post  
  • The Bradford West MP shared the claim and added supportive comments
  • The post was made in 2014 before Ms Shah became an MP in the Commons
  • Labour has been rocked by a series of anti-Semitism rows in recent weeks
  • Jeremy Corbyn repeatedly urged to speak out clearly against abuse 
Labour MP Naz Shah today apologised and quit as an aide to John McDonnell over the row 
Labour MP Naz Shah today apologised and quit as an aide to John McDonnell over the row 
Labour MP today has resigned as an aide to John McDonnell after sharing a graphic on social media that appeared to say Israel should be 'relocated' to America.

Bradford West MP Naz Shah shared an image that showed an outline of Israel superimposed on to a map of the USA.

The headline on the image said: 'Solution for Israel-Palestine Conflict - Relocate Israel into United States.'

Ms Shah then wrote with the post: 'problem solved.'

The Muslim MP today apologised for 'offence caused' before quitting as the shadow chancellor's PPS. 

The resignation will reignite a bitter row within Labour about whether Jeremy Corbyn has done enough to combat anti-Semitism among some new members who have joined the party under his leadership.

Tory MPs today led calls for Ms Shah to be suspended from the Labour Party over the incident.
The Facebook post, shared by Ms Shah in 2014 before she became an MP, suggested the US has 'plenty of land' to accommodate Israel as a 51st state, allowing Palestinians to 'get their life and their land back'.

It added that Israeli people would be welcome and safe in the US while the 'transportation cost' would be less than three years' worth of Washington's support for Israeli defence spending.

Ms Shah added a note suggesting the plan might 'save them some pocket money'.

After the posting was highlighted by the Guido Fawkes website, Ms Shah released a statement in which she said: 'This post from two years ago was made before I was an MP, does not reflect my views and I apologise for any offence it has caused.'


Tuesday, April 26, 2016

YOU COULDN'T MAKE IT UP

Take another look at the audience at Barack Obama’s ‘town hall’ meeting in London. Is this a portrait of Britain you recognise?

I know we are ordered to celebrate ‘diversity’ at all times, but was it really a genuine representation of our population as a whole? OK, so London is now one of the most multicultural cities on earth, to the extent where some parts of town can feel like a foreign country.
But even so. And before the usual, brain-dead suspects start bouncing up and down, screaming ‘raaay-cist!’, let me make it abundantly clear that I am not criticising any individual in the hand-picked audience.
They were hardly going to turn down an opportunity to be in the same room as the President of the United States, although I suspect they wouldn’t have been quite so keen to get up close and personal with George W. Bush.
What a motley crew, though. It made your average BBC Question Time audience look balanced. Needless to say, there was the obligatory number of women in Islamic headgear, without which no televised gathering can be broadcast.
The President was introduced on Saturday not by the democratically elected Mayor of London, as one might have expected, but by 21-year-old Khadija Najefi, a political science graduate who has recently been working as a volunteer at the Jungle camp in Calais, from where thousands of migrants have been attempting to enter Britain illegally.

No box was left unticked. Other guests included a woman engaged in tackling ‘gender inequalities’, an Iraqi refugee, a disabled domestic violence campaigner and someone described as a ‘non-binary Muslim’, who refuses to define as either male or female.
You couldn’t make it up.
Charities invited included the usual bunch of self-obsessed agitators for gay and transgender ‘rights’ and an obscure outfit called the Anti-Tribalism Movement. Nope, me neither.
The regulation sprinkling of luvvies starred Sherlock actor Benedict Cumberbatch, last seen preaching from the stage at London’s Barbican Theatre about why Britain should take in millions of migrants from Syria and beyond.
To be honest, if I’d have sat down and written in advance a parody of the Obama event for last Friday’s column, I couldn’t have come up with such an absurd cast list. And if I had, by lunchtime I would have been inundated with emails reading: ‘Steady on, Rich, you’ve gone a bit far this time.’
For the record, I’m all in favour of including people from different backgrounds in public life. We could do, for instance, with more coppers from ethnic minorities.
Our institutions should embrace and look like the people they are paid to represent. But in our official desire to prove how inclusive we are, the pendulum has swung off the charts.
Far from being under-represented, certain minority groups are now seriously over-represented. Look at the influence the gobby but minuscule ‘trans’ lobby now wields — even in primary schools. Islam packs a powerful punch in shaping the national debate, as the recent compelling Trevor Phillips documentary demonstrated so vividly.
So it was no surprise to see women in headscarves sitting front and centre in the President’s audience, or to discover that the audience also featured an assortment of LGBT activists, migrant cheerleaders and the token ‘non-binary Muslim’.
I watched Obama’s speech live and couldn’t help being struck by the contradiction inherent in him banging on about the advance of equal rights to a crowd which included a fair number of women wearing one of the most visible symbols of religious separatism and female oppression.
We have, of course, been here before. Last summer Michelle Obama flew into London and visited a school in the Islamic Republic of Tower Hamlets, where most of the girls were covered from head to toe.
Perhaps the Obamas think that’s how all women in Britain dress these days. It might be significant that when the Queen greeted them at Windsor she was also wearing a headscarf — admittedly more Nora Batty than downtown Riyadh.
Do Barack and Michelle think Her Maj has converted to Islam, too? I only ask because whenever they come to Britain they seem desperately keen to promote the Muslim agenda.
The audience was specially chosen by the American Embassy. Even to those of us who live in London, it appeared heavily weighted to appease the ‘diversity’ brigade.
Leave aside for a moment what it must have looked like from those areas of Britain — the vast majority — which are still predominantly white. What must it have looked like from Middle America, to television viewers who have formed their impression of this country from watching Midsomer Murders and Downton Abbey?
Scanning Obama’s itinerary, they could be forgiven for thinking that Britain has been transformed into a nation of cross-dressing, non-binary Muslims who like nothing better of an evening than to come home after a round of golf with Call Me Dave, beat the hell out of their disabled wives, before heading off on a rocking horse to the weekly wheelchair disco in aid of refugees, at the ‘non-binary’ Anti-Tribalism workshop in Windsor Castle.

Purely coincidentally, I was out and about in Kentish Town on Saturday. For the uninitiated, it’s a scruffy bit of North London for people who can’t afford to live in Hampstead and are prepared to pay seven figures for a two-up, two-down railway cottage. The locals consider themselves as impeccably liberal as their near neighbours in Jeremy Corbyn’s Islington.
I’m told they rounded up the last ever reader of the print edition of the Independent and had him stuffed and mounted for posterity.
Yet even Kentish Town doesn’t look like the audience at the Obama town hall meeting, which for all the world resembled a Guardianista’s wet dream.
Well, it certainly didn’t on Saturday night. It was packed with balding, middle-aged white gits like me, flocking to see Wilko Johnson — Canvey Island’s answer to Chuck Berry. No sign of the Obamas, though.
I even spotted a couple of blokes in T-shirts sporting the Cross of St George — an emblem the pious Left consider horribly ‘racist’.
Oh, didn’t I mention it? Saturday was St George’s Day, celebrating the patron saint of England. We should enjoy it while we can, before it’s banned in the name of diversity.